While shooting “The Blues Brothers” movie, they had a budget for cocaine.

9/08/2022

https://www.art.com/products/p48870313793-sa-i11043776/the-blues-brothers-1980-directed-by-john-landis-john-belushi-and-dan-aykroyd-photo.htm?epik=dj0yJnU9NTNOSm92VDVuMGJMNzZoeVZFekF3Q1FpYlk0WWxzM0cmcD0wJm49VXdBVy1RVjNFWFBiWjloV1VkeXRJUSZ0PUFBQUFBR0x5R1U0

We had a budget in the movie for cocaine for night shoots,” Dan Aykroyd tells Vanity Fair contributing editor Ned Zeman of the careening, madcap production of John Landis’s 1980 movie, The Blues Brothers, in which he starred alongside John Belushi. “Everyone did it, including me. Never to excess, and not ever to where I wanted to buy it or have it. [But] John, he just loved what it did. It sort of brought him alive at night—that superpower feeling where you start to talk and converse and figure you can solve all the world’s problems.” From the impulsive and inspired 1979 movie pitch (“John Belushi, Dan Aykroyd, Blues Brothers, how about it?”), through the torturous journey of a project by turns musical, comedy, buddy movie, and bloated vanity proj­ect, Zeman chronicles the triumph of a film (and its stars) that often seemed beyond salvation.

In the feature, which appears in the January issue of V.F., Zeman uncovers the wild antics alternately plaguing and fueling the production:

The DEA spends an average of $4.20 for every marijuana plant they uproot.

Post First Published: 9/08/2022 Post First Edited: 17 September 2022

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https://edition.cnn.com/2022/04/03/investing/stocks-week-ahead/index.html

From: The government spent $18 million destroying marijuana plants last year – By Christopher Ingraham. Washington Post. April 15, 2016 at 10:18 AM EDT.

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The Drug Enforcement Administration’s controversial cannabis eradication program continued apace in 2015, new numbers released by the administration show. In 2015, local, state and federal authorities uprooted roughly 4.1 million cultivated marijuana plants in all 50 states, down slightly from the haul of 4.3 million plants in 2014.

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Federal spending on the program remained at $18 million dollars, consistent with levels seen in previous years. That works out to a cost-per-plant of $4.42, up slightly from a cost of $4.20 per plant in 2014 (yes, really).

For fiscal year 2014, the DEA estimated that the asset forfeiture program provided $18 million dollars to fund the cannabis eradication program. At 4.3 million marijuana plants destroyed, that works out to a cost of about $4.19 per plant. For simplicity’s sake, let’s round that number to the nearest dime and call it $4.20.

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The DEA’s program provides funding to 128 state and local law enforcement agencies to aggressively search for, seize and destroy illegal marijuana grows across the country. Much of the money for the program comes from the Justice Department’s asset forfeiture fund, a controversial program in its own right. In many states, the eradication program money is used to fund aerial operations involving helicopters scouring the countryside for marijuana. Sometimes, overzealous or untrained officers seize perfectly legal plants, like okra, mistaking them for marijuana.

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Last year, a group of lawmakers led by Rep. Ted Lieu (D-Calif.) tried to pass legislation to redirect marijuana eradication funds to perhaps more productive uses, such as domestic violence prevention programs. The effort was ultimately unsuccessful, and Lieu is dismayed to see the program continue. “Marijuana needs to be removed from Schedule I classification, and DEA should stop this wasteful program,” he said via email.

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Indeed, eradication programs continued last year in states such as Washington and Oregon that have legalized marijuana for adult recreational use. While full state breakdowns aren’t yet available, a DEA spokesman said that just under 36,000 marijuana plants were destroyed in Washington last year at a cost to federal taxpayers of about $950,000, or roughly $26 per plant.

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The DEA did note, however, that at least two states declined to accept federal eradication funds last year: Alaska and Colorado, where marijuana is now legal. Those states conducted their own enforcement efforts against illegal marijuana grows.

In many ways, the federal marijuana eradication program is a holdover from the earlier days of the drug war. Four states plus the District of Columbia have legalized marijuana for adult use, several other states are hoping to do so this year, and a growing chorus of researcherslawmakersdoctors and the general public is calling on the federal government to change course on marijuana policy.

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“It makes zero sense for the federal government to continue to spend taxpayer dollars on cannabis eradication at a time when states across the country are looking to legalize marijuana,” Lieu said. “I will continue to fight against DEA’s Domestic Cannabis Eradication/Suppression Program in Congress and work to redirect these funds to worthwhile programs.”

Jonah Hill snorted so much fake cocaine while filming “The Wolf of Wall Street” that he got bronchitis.

8/08/2022

From: Jonah Hill: ‘Snorting fake cocaine in a Scorsese movie is pretty iconic’ (The Guardian Interview With Hermione Hoby, 2014)

https://www.wallpaperflare.com/movie-the-wolf-of-wall-street-donnie-azoff-jonah-hill-wallpaper-sbwsk

Being cast in The Wolf of Wall Street, Scorsese’s biopic about Jordan Belfort, the New York stockbroker multimillionaire played by Leonardo DiCaprio, has evidently been nothing short of a dream. “[People] can diss me all they want on a blog or in a magazine and I’ll just be like: ‘Whatever, man. Scorsese thinks I’m awesome,'” Hill recently told an American journalist. He tells me he was terrified of jinxing his audition for Donnie, the orthodontically challenged, pastel-shirted degenerate who becomes Belfort’s sidekick after meeting him in a diner, so he didn’t tell anyone. It’s a sterling part, with Donnie being drawn into a life of excess and greed, and in many ways it’s Hill’s film, despite the actor taking on another supporting role (Moneyball paired him with Brad Pitt and 21 Jump Street with Channing Tatum). “Donnie’s very entertaining,” says Hill, “because there’s no impulse control, no morality at all. He does whatever he feels like that second without considering anyone else. He’s just pretty vile.”

The film itself has a similar feel: relentlessly entertaining but brazenly, outrageously amoral. I tell him watching it felt a bit like eating a whole chocolate cake; delicious at first, but you soon start to feel sick. Hill nods. “We had orgy scenes and shooting those was pretty repulsive – naked people in a confined space for 18 hours a day. It was not sexy at all.”

And then there were the avalanches of “cocaine” – vitamin D powder hoovered up by Hill and DiCaprio line after cigar-fat line in every scene. “I snorted so much of that stuff that I got, like, bronchitis!” Hill laughs. “My lungs were filled with powder and I got really sick for a month and a half. But, I mean, I’d do it again in a second. The first time you snort fake cocaine in a Scorsese movie you feel like… I don’t know!” He winces. “I got embarrassed because I said that it’s every actor’s dream. I guess it’s not, but to me, it’s a pretty iconic thing to do. “

There’s a moment where he lurches in slow motion around DiCaprio’s shoulder at a pool table, quaaluded to the point of collapse. “And it’s just so cool-looking!” he pants. “Scorsese’s the person who does that better than anyone in the world. I was so excited to get to be shot, in slo-mo, doing drugs in one of his movies.”

He talks fondly of DiCaprio “physically tormenting” him in many of their fight scenes. But Hill got his own back. In a scene where their characters share a sushi lunch, Hill is scripted to eat the last piece of sushi. “He has to ask whether I’m going to eat the last piece,” says Hill. “But instead of saying my scripted yes, I decided to say no. And I kept saying no,” he laughs, to the point where they did take after take and DiCaprio was forced to keep eating until he genuinely threw up. “It’s so unfortunate that’s what makes me happy,” Hill says. “I guess that’s my little speckle of Donnie.”

If there’s a speckle of Donnie, it’s hard to see it beneath the nice young Jewish boy who took his mother as his date to the Oscars. This is Sharon Lyn, a costume designer, married to Richard Feldstein, a tour accountant for acts like Madonna and Guns N’ Roses. Hill is their middle child; he has a younger sister and an elder brother, Jordan Feldstein, manager to Maroon 5 and Robin Thicke.

Hill grew up in LA, but it was New York that afforded him his first break. While studying at Bard College he’d put on small plays in a Manhattan dive bar and it was through these that he befriended Dustin Hoffman’s kids. He then so impressed their dad with prank calls and improvised comedy that Hoffman engineered an audition for  Huckabees, the 2004 David O Russell film. Hill got the role but didn’t work again for three years. He’d audition for TV sitcoms, but “I would always get in trouble because I would rewrite all their material because it wasn’t very good. I was 18 and I was like: ‘Oh, they’re going to be so happy – I’m making their material better!'”

Then in 2007 Judd Apatow cast him in Superbad as a hornily deranged teenager alongside a meek Michael Cera, and everything changed. He recalls coming out of his tiny LA apartment, bleary from playing video games, and looking up to see an enormous billboard with his face on it. He owes everything, he insists – the Oscar nomination, getting cast by Scorsese – to Apatow and Seth Rogen: “They are and were so amazing to me.”

I ask him about the Oscars ceremony. Who had more fun, him or his mother?

“She did!” he shouts. “She was sitting next to Brad Pitt’s mom; she was having the time of her life. Owen Wilson’s mom and her were talking all night! All the moms were there. It was a big thing, the moms. I love having her around.”

So much so that he even invited her on set for True Story, a drama out later this year based on the real-life relationship between the journalist Michael Finkel, played by Hill, and Christian Longo, an FBI most-wanted murderer played by James Franco. The film was shot out in the snow in a harsh New York winter and was, he says, “honestly depressing”. “So I was like: ‘Hey Mom, do you want to come hang out for a few months so we can enjoy this time? I miss my family so much.'”

True Story will be Hill’s 30th film, but despite the credits and accolades, the third most popular Google search word for Hill remains “weight”. Today he’s not the rotund of Superbad nor quite the skinny of post- Moneyball; he looks tall and broad-chested, well-groomed, with close-cropped hair.

Did he feel it was important to step away from comedy? “It’s not like I don’t like comedy and don’t like making people laugh – I truly enjoy it. But I realised once I got success in that world, it was… well, I love all different kinds of films. I love dramatic films as much as comedic films. And so when Superbad came out I made a really conscious effort not to star in another film until it was something that presented some sort of different challenge. The reason is, I won’t get better if I just keep working on things I’ve done already.”

Maybe, but it is the non-serious stuff he’s loved for – more recently, the feckless overgrown kid of a cop in 21 Jump Street and the burlesque version of himself in This is the End, where, mid-apocalypse, he begins a prayer with this line: “Dear God, it’s me, Jonah Hill… from Moneyball.”

Not that God needed the reminder – Hill is now pretty much a household name.

“Is that true? In England?” he says, eyes popping happily.

Does he enjoy being famous?

“I never complain about any facet of celebrity or anything because it would be ridiculous to go be in movies and then complain that people know who you are, right?  I don’t really like being famous, it’s not something I ever wanted, but I wouldn’t trade being in movies for anything. And getting people knowing who you are and liking your films allows you to make films.”

He recounts being at a urinal a year or so ago and having the guy next to him lean in, swing his arm round him and snap a selfie. “I’m like: there’s no more vulnerable, private space! But I’ll never complain. I just want to make movies that I want to go see. I’m the luckiest guy ever, because I would go see those movies opening night!”

I believe him. The way he enthuses about film is guileless, like a kid. He will, however, be celebrating his 30th birthday a few days after we meet. He jokes: “It’s OK, my life’s over, that’s fine” but also says that turning 30 means feeling “a lot more confident about not doing things, you know? This is the first time ever that I’ve felt I’m not going to take a role unless it’s something I’m really passionate about and it’s really going to challenge me. When I decide to play a part, I care about it as much as anyone could care about anything. I started when I was really young and I was always the youngest person in the room. Now I just feel like I have a seat at the table in some way. Respectfully. You know?

“The goal was to work with Martin Scorsese, and I got to do it and that’s all I wanted in my creative life. That was my dream.”

 The Wolf of Wall Street opens on 17 January

More on The Wolf of Wall Street

 News: The Wolf of Wall Street criticised for ‘glorifying psychopathic behaviour’
 Oscar predictions 2014: The Wolf of Wall Street

In 2013, A Fake Tweet Temporarily Wiped Out US$130 Billion Off The Stock Market.

Post First Published: 8/08/2022 11:48 AM Post First Updated: October 2 4:19 PM

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https://about.twitter.com/en
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From : How Does One Fake Tweet Cause a Stock Market Crash? By Christopher Matthews April 24, 2013.

And Fake Tweet Sees $136.5 Billion Wiped Off S&P

At 1:07 p.m. on Tuesday, the Twitter feed of the Associated Press told us that Barack Obama had been injured in an explosion at the White House. The tweet was fake — the product of a hack — but given the events in Boston last week, the news spread like wildfire, garnering more that 4,000 retweets.

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The AP quickly addressed the situation, suspending its Twitter account, and alerting readers through associated accounts that the tweet describing an explosion at the White House was the result of a hack.  No harm, no foul, right?

Well, not exactly. According to the Financial Times, that one tweet sent shock waves through the stock market — causing the S&P 500 to decline 0.9% — enough to wipe out $130 billion in stock value in a matter of seconds. The market quickly recovered that value, but the breakneck pace at which the stock market tumbled reminded many people of the infamous 2010 “flash crash,” or last year’s crisis at Knight Capital Management, in which a computer glitch cost the firm $440 million and nearly sent it into bankruptcy.

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(MORE: High Frequency Trading: Wall Street’s Doomsday Machine?)

Both of these events were caused by the proliferation of high-frequency trading, or the practice of Wall Street firms using high-powered computers to execute thousands or millions of trades per second, making miniscule profits — that add up in a big way — on each trade.

Though nobody knows for sure what exactly precipitated Tuesday’s volatility, many market watchers blamed high-frequency traders, and more specifically the variety that use algorithms to comb through the internet at lightning-quick speeds, actually “reading” news items and tweets, and making trades based off of that information.

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How do these computer programs do this? According to Irene Aldrige, managing partner and quantitative portfolio manager at ABLE Alpha Trading, and author of a new book on high frequency trading, the “method is actually quite simplistic.” High frequency traders compile a list of news sources like SEC filings, business publications, and, yes, Twitter, and tell their computer programs to comb through those sources looking for specific words or phrases like “bankruptcy” or “merger” that signal something about the broader market or specific companies. Obviously, not every instance of a negative word in a story is going to mean that a specific company, or the broader market, is going to lose value, but these programs are able to filter through so much information that in the aggregate, these methods are often money-makers for HFT firms.

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(MORE: Are Average Investors Getting Bilked by Wall Street Supercomputers?)

As for Tuesday’s incident, it’s possible that many firms had the words “White House,” “explosion,” or “Barack Obama” in their databases as key words that could trigger selling given the right circumstances. According to Aldridge, “If a trusted news source with a lot of followers like the Associated Press sends out those words close together that may have triggered some selling.” Aldridge says the fact that so many people re-tweeted the message — many of whom were trusted journalists themselves — would likely make the news appear even more trustworthy to these bots.

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In the grand scheme of things, Tuesday’s mini-crash was not a big deal. “No long-term investors lost any money,” says Aldridge. The market recovered almost instantaneously, and an optimist may look at the event as an example of high-frequency algorithms behaving in a more orderly manner than they have in the past.

For others however, the event proves that high-frequency traders are nothing more than a fair-weather friend. Proponents of high-frequency trading argue that the preponderance of activity they bring to the marketplace adds liquidity and brings down trading costs. There is probably some truth to this argument, as trading costs have never been lower. At the same time, Tuesday shows that when the going gets tough, these computers tend to sell quickly and run for the hills, actually reducing liquidity when the market needs it most.

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In the end however, high-frequency trading isn’t going anywhere, and neither is Twitter. Federal regulators are in the process of developing new rules to reign in volatility caused by trading algorithms, and that will be an ongoing process that will probably take years. But Tuesday’s mini-crash also teaches us that Twitter and news organizations themselves have to be even more vigilant about their own security. After all, it’s not just humans who are reading, and reacting, to information anymore.

(MORE: 10 Best and Worst Sports-Team Relocations in History)

Read More From https://business.time.com/

5 Surprising Things You Can Buy With Food Stamps

In 2013, a fake tweet temporarily wiped out US$130 billion off the stock market.

8/08/2022

https://about.twitter.com/en

From : How Does One Fake Tweet Cause a Stock Market Crash? By Christopher Matthews April 24, 2013.

And Fake Tweet Sees $136.5 Billion Wiped Off S&P

At 1:07 p.m. on Tuesday, the Twitter feed of the Associated Press told us that Barack Obama had been injured in an explosion at the White House. The tweet was fake — the product of a hack — but given the events in Boston last week, the news spread like wildfire, garnering more that 4,000 retweets.

Advertisements

The AP quickly addressed the situation, suspending its Twitter account, and alerting readers through associated accounts that the tweet describing an explosion at the White House was the result of a hack.  No harm, no foul, right?

Well, not exactly. According to the Financial Times, that one tweet sent shock waves through the stock market — causing the S&P 500 to decline 0.9% — enough to wipe out $130 billion in stock value in a matter of seconds. The market quickly recovered that value, but the breakneck pace at which the stock market tumbled reminded many people of the infamous 2010 “flash crash,” or last year’s crisis at Knight Capital Management, in which a computer glitch cost the firm $440 million and nearly sent it into bankruptcy.

Advertisements

(MORE: High Frequency Trading: Wall Street’s Doomsday Machine?)

Both of these events were caused by the proliferation of high-frequency trading, or the practice of Wall Street firms using high-powered computers to execute thousands or millions of trades per second, making miniscule profits — that add up in a big way — on each trade.

Though nobody knows for sure what exactly precipitated Tuesday’s volatility, many market watchers blamed high-frequency traders, and more specifically the variety that use algorithms to comb through the internet at lightning-quick speeds, actually “reading” news items and tweets, and making trades based off of that information.

Advertisements

How do these computer programs do this? According to Irene Aldrige, managing partner and quantitative portfolio manager at ABLE Alpha Trading, and author of a new book on high frequency trading, the “method is actually quite simplistic.” High frequency traders compile a list of news sources like SEC filings, business publications, and, yes, Twitter, and tell their computer programs to comb through those sources looking for specific words or phrases like “bankruptcy” or “merger” that signal something about the broader market or specific companies. Obviously, not every instance of a negative word in a story is going to mean that a specific company, or the broader market, is going to lose value, but these programs are able to filter through so much information that in the aggregate, these methods are often money-makers for HFT firms.

(MORE: Are Average Investors Getting Bilked by Wall Street Supercomputers?)

Advertisements

As for Tuesday’s incident, it’s possible that many firms had the words “White House,” “explosion,” or “Barack Obama” in their databases as key words that could trigger selling given the right circumstances. According to Aldridge, “If a trusted news source with a lot of followers like the Associated Press sends out those words close together that may have triggered some selling.” Aldridge says the fact that so many people re-tweeted the message — many of whom were trusted journalists themselves — would likely make the news appear even more trustworthy to these bots.

In the grand scheme of things, Tuesday’s mini-crash was not a big deal. “No long-term investors lost any money,” says Aldridge. The market recovered almost instantaneously, and an optimist may look at the event as an example of high-frequency algorithms behaving in a more orderly manner than they have in the past.

Advertisements

For others however, the event proves that high-frequency traders are nothing more than a fair-weather friend. Proponents of high-frequency trading argue that the preponderance of activity they bring to the marketplace adds liquidity and brings down trading costs. There is probably some truth to this argument, as trading costs have never been lower. At the same time, Tuesday shows that when the going gets tough, these computers tend to sell quickly and run for the hills, actually reducing liquidity when the market needs it most.

Advertisements

In the end however, high-frequency trading isn’t going anywhere, and neither is Twitter. Federal regulators are in the process of developing new rules to reign in volatility caused by trading algorithms, and that will be an ongoing process that will probably take years. But Tuesday’s mini-crash also teaches us that Twitter and news organizations themselves have to be even more vigilant about their own security. After all, it’s not just humans who are reading, and reacting, to information anymore.

(MORE: 10 Best and Worst Sports-Team Relocations in History)

Read More From https://business.time.com/

5 Surprising Things You Can Buy With Food Stamps

The iPhone only exists because Steve Jobs ‘hated this guy at Microsoft’

Post First Published: 8/08/2022 Post Updated: 27/08/2022

Via https://www.theguardian.com/The iPhone only exists because Steve Jobs ‘hated this guy at Microsoft’ – Samuel Gibbs 21 June 2017

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If it wasn’t for one particular executive at Microsoft, whom Steve Jobs seemingly hated with a passion, Apple may never have created the iPhone or iPad.

Recounting the story of the birth of the iPhone at a talk at the Computer History Museum in California, former Apple iOS chief Scott Forstall said: “The iPhone had a very circuitous route. We’d been working on a tablet project.

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“It began because Steve hated this guy at Microsoft. Any time Steve had any interaction with the guy, he’d come back pissed off.”

The unnamed Microsoft executive, who was apparently the husband of a friend of Jobs’s wife Laurene Powell Jobs, continuously talked and bragged about Redmond-based company’s plans for tablets and styluses, so much so that Jobs decided to try and beat him.

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After being badgered by the Microsoft executive over dinner for the 10th time, being told how Microsoft was going to change the world with its tablet PC software and stylus and that Apple should just license it, Jobs lost patience and, as recounted in Walter Isaacson’s Jobs biography, said: “Fuck this, let’s show him what a tablet can really be”.

Despite the iPad having the Apple Pencil today, Jobs famously hated styluses. Forstall recounted Jobs as saying: “You don’t use a stylus … we’re born with 10 styluses”.

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During the development of the iPad, which began as a table-sized multi-touch prototype on which you could move photos with your fingers codenamed “project purple”, Apple identified that smartphones were becoming a threat to its iPod business and so diverted efforts towards what was to become the iPhone.

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Forstall recounted Jobs saying: “‘Do you think you could take that demo that we’re doing with the tablet and the multi-touch and shrink it down to something small enough to fit in your pocket?’

“We went back to the design team and they took it and they carved out a corner of it,” said Forstall. “Steve saw it and said ‘put the tablet on hold, let’s build a phone.’ And that’s what we did.”

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The original iPhone wasn’t as well received by reviewers as you might expect at the time of its release in 2007, who were rating it against the number of clicks to get to certain things.

Forstall said: “It was being compared against other smartphones of the time, BlackBerry etc, according to the metrics people thought were important at the time.

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“What they didn’t get was we were changing the entire paradigm. We were changing the entire way things were done.”

Initial sales were good, but not exceptional. After spending time with one in the real world, Forstall said he and the rest of Apple could see it was going to be huge one day.

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Forstall also touched on his personal sickness in the early 2000s from an obscure virus, which was apparently cured when nothing else would do the trick by Jobs’s acupuncturist. Forstall, who was infamous at Apple for being the person who pushed the use of computer interfaces that appeared like real-life objects, also revealed he had “never heard of skeuomorphism” at the time.

The average car in Britain is parked for 96% of the time.

7/08/2022

Frankwell Car Park https://www.shropshirestar.com/news/transport/2019/08/01/free-parking-launched-for-shrewsbury-shoppers-in-august/

Figures analysed by the RAC Foundation show around 80 per cent of Britain’s 26 million homes were built with a front plot. Of these around seven million gardens are now concreted over to park cars rather than grow flowers-that’s an area equivalent to 100 Hype Parks or 72 Olympic Parks.

Car parked for 96% of the time

The report is an in-depth look at parking patterns and provision across Britain. Other interesting facts revealed in the report include that the average car is parked at home for 80 per cent of the time, parked elsewhere for 16 per cent of the time and is only on the move for 4 per cent of the time. This reveals a huge waste of resources inherent in individual car ownership and is helping to inspire the use of car clubs or car sharing services.

The lost of front gardens is also a contributory factor in the decline of garden birds such as house sparrows and impacts on other wildlife such as hedgehogs.

The RAC Foundation wants to see more parking provisions to help with the rise in car ownership.

Professor Stephen Glaister, director of the RAC Foundation, said: “Car ownership is set to keep on rising, but where are these vehicles going to go? Unless we want to see more streets clogged up and front gardens disappear then councils need to address the matter. Ministers decision last year to remove the cap on parking spaces at new developments will help.”

Read More Of The Article: https://web.archive.org/web/20131002230119/http://www.thegreencarwebsite.co.uk/blog/index.php/2012/07/17/seven-million-uk-lawns-lost-to-park-cars/

Britain accidentally invaded Spain in 2002.

7/08/2022

British Royal Marines landing during an exercise

Red-faced Royal Marines have been forced to beat a hasty retreat after storming a Spanish beach resort instead of the fortress rock of Gibraltar.

A map-reading glitch sent the 20-strong invasion force onto the beach at La Linea, the town on the frontier with the British colony, to the surprise of Spanish locals.

The marines were greeted by two local policeman who watched in amazement as the heavily armed troops rushed ashore from two launches on Sunday morning.

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The mayor of La Linea, Juan Carlos Juarez, said: “They landed on our coast to confront a supposed enemy with typical Commando tactics.

“But we managed to hold them on the beach.”

Dominique Searle, editor of the Rock’s daily newspaper, The Gibraltar Chronicle said: “What a boob.”

“We don’t know who was in command of the invasion force but the feeling is he should brush-up on his map reading.

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“But to be fair he was only a couple of hundred yards from the right spot.”

Spain and Britain are Nato allies but are locked in a long-running dispute about the sovereignty of Gibraltar.

Spain magnanimously spared Britain’s blushes by accepting the landing had been a genuine mistake.

“We are not going to protest. From our point of view the matter is closed,” a Foreign Ministry spokesman said.

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The marines were sailing on HMS Ocean

The British Ministry of Defence said it was a situation it would “rather not have taken place”.

“Two landing craft from HMS Ocean accidentally entered Spanish territorial waters and in bad weather one landing craft landed on the beach a few yards over the Spanish side of the border,” a spokesman explained.

“About 20 Royal Marines disembarked for about five minutes and then the error was recognised and they all withdrew.”

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The gaffe came at an unfortunate time as talks between Foreign Secretary Jack Straw and his Spanish counterpart, Josep Pique, aimed at ending the centuries old dispute over the rock have stirred up animosity in both countries.

Gibraltarians and their political leaders are furious at suggestions that sovereignty of the peninsula could be shared.

A deal on its future is likely to be reached in the next few months.

Read More: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/1827554.stm

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The inventor of Vaseline used to eat a spoonful of it every day.

Post First Published: 7/08/2022 1:17 PM Post First Updated: 20 September 2022 4:04 PM

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https://theklog.co/vaseline-moisturizer-test-hack/
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Sir Robert Augustus Chesebrough, (January 9, 1837 – September 8, 1933) was an American chemist. He discovered petroleum jelly, which he marketed as Vaseline, and founded the Chesebrough Manufacturing Company.

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Sir Robert Chesebrough started his career as a chemist who refined kerosene from the oil of the sperm whales. The man was curious to say the least. He discovered Petroleum in Titusville, Pennsylvania and to discover more of this resource he traveled to Titusville quitting his job. He went there to research upon the new materials that might be created from this new found fuel. This is how he discovered petroleum jelly, which he trade named as Vaseline.

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Chesebrough had great faith in this product and before sending it to the market for the first time he applied it to his own cuts and burns. Being satisfied with his product, he tried to sell it to a few chemist shops, but no one was ready to trust this new invention of his, and so he failed in all his attempts to sell it.

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Then one fine day he traveled to New York to give a demonstration of his product. In front of a large crowd, he burnt his skin with an open flame or an acid, and then applied petroleum jelly all over it, in order to demonstrate the miraculous effect of this product. He even distributed free samples to increase the demand of this product.

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His struggle finally paid off in 1870 when he commenced his first factory and named this product ‘Vaseline’ with a patent labeled on it.

Since then several people claimed that Chesebrough had so much faith in his product that he even used to have a spoonful of it every morning.

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Speculations were proven to be true when Chesebrough himself confessed that he used to have it in the morning for several years – he in fact lived to be 96.

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No one knows if this too is a speculation, but it is an undeniable truth that Vaseline has made healing a lot easier in our daily lives.

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German chocolate cake was invented in Texas

Post First Published: July 3 2022 8:13 AM Post First Updated: October 2 2022 6:43 PM

https://www.rd.com/list/interesting-facts/

It may surprise you to learn that German Chocolate Cake is not actually German. (But don’t worry, it’s still very much chocolate and still very much cake.) And it’s also very Texan.

Pecans aren’t historically found in the German diet, but Texans sure love them. Buttermilk — which is mixed with chocolate in the cake — is also a Southern staple. As it turns out, the cake is an American creation, not brought to us from German immigrants as many have thought.

After researching the origins of the cake, every bite and nibble took us back to a recipe that ran in The Dallas Morning News in June 1957 called German Sweet Chocolate Cake.

Mrs. George Clay of Southeast Dallas submitted her recipe to the food pages of our newspaper — Julie Benell’s Recipe of the Day column — using Baker’s German’s Sweet Chocolate, which still exists today. It was called “German’s” chocolate after Samuel German, who invented the sweetened chocolate while working for Baker’s Chocolate, which was then owned by General Foods. (It’s now owned by Kraft). It’s a chocolate that includes sugar, which provides a shortcut for bakers.

According to What’s Cooking America, the 1957 recipe was picked up by other newspapers across the country, and sales of Baker’s chocolate soared along with the popularity of the cake.

Confusion about the origins of the cake have persisted. In 1963, according to a story in The Dallas Morning News, even President Lyndon B. Johnson served the cake at his Johnson City ranch for a luncheon with German Chancellor Ludwig Erhard. We can’t seem to find any reports on if Chancellor Erhard liked the cake, or if he realized it was erroneously made in honor of his home country.

References:

125 Interesting Facts About Practically Everything – Reader’s Digest. Elizabeth Yuko July 1 2022

https://www.rd.com/list/interesting-facts/

Did you know? The German Chocolate Cake is not actually German, it’s Texan – The Dallas Morning News. Erin Booke May 7th 2018

https://www.dallasnews.com/food/cooking/2018/05/07/did-you-know-the-german-chocolate-cake-is-not-actually-german-it-s-texan/

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