The time travel machine in  “Back to the Future” was supposed to be a refrigerator.

15/08/2022

https://www.artofthetitle.com/title/back-to-the-future/

From:

How Back To The Future Almost Nuked The Fridge

BY PETER SCIRETTA/JULY 15, 2009 6:00 AM EDT,


After Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull was released, a new pop culture term was coined. Nuke The Fridge is a reference to the film’s opening scene (possible spoilers if you haven’t seen it) where Indiana Jones finds himself on a Nuclear test site and hides in a refrigerator to survive the atomic blast. The phrase Nuke The Fridge was joined as an alternative to Jump The Shark, another pop culture term based on a scene in an episode of Happy Days when Fonzie literally jumps over a shark while water skiing. The scene was considered so preposterous, and is considered by many to signify the moment in time when the show became unappealing to its core audience.

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How Back To The Future Almost Nuked The Fridge

BY PETER SCIRETTA/JULY 15, 2009 6:00 AM EDT
After Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull was released, a new pop culture term was coined. Nuke The Fridge is a reference to the film’s opening scene (possible spoilers if you haven’t seen it) where Indiana Jones finds himself on a Nuclear test site and hides in a refrigerator to survive the atomic blast. The phrase Nuke The Fridge was joined as an alternative to Jump The Shark, another pop culture term based on a scene in an episode of Happy Days when Fonzie literally jumps over a shark while water skiing. The scene was considered so preposterous, and is considered by many to signify the moment in time when the show became unappealing to its core audience.

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But did you know that Back to the Future almost Nuked The Fridge almost 25 years earlier?

In the original draft of Back To The Future, Marty McFly worked for Professor Brown, who was a movie bootlegger and the time machine was a laser device that was housed in a room. In the story’s climax, the device was attached to a refrigerator, and taken to the Nevada desert test site for the atomic bomb, where it was strapped into the back of a truck and driven into the atomic explosion in order to harness the power from the nuclear explosion. Marty had to climb into the fridge as the truck barreled towards ground zero.

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Why was the idea scrapped? Director Robert Zemeckis has said in interviews that producer Steven Spielberg was afraid that children would start climbing into refrigerators and getting trapped inside, after replicating the scene in the film. Who would have thought that he would have made a film where the hero climbs into a fridge at a nuclear test site almost 25 years later.

Zemeckis still believed that the time machine should move, and they came up with the idea of using a retrofitted DeLorean because it could lead to the gag of farmer Peabody thinking it was a UFO/Aliens. The concept of the Hill Valley courthouse didn’t come until much later. Even the third draft of the screenplay involved taking the DeLorean time machine to the atomic bomb test site. The idea was scrapped because it was deemed too expensive for the budget. ILM wanted one million dollars to create the bomb effect, and at that time, that was a lot of money. The power source was changed to lightening and the location was changed to the Hill Valley courthouse, which they filmed on the Universal Backlot.

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Art director Andrew Probert was hired onto the project, and actually storyboarded the Nevada Atomic Bomb Test Site sequence from the third draft before the idea was scrapped. Probert presented the storyboarded sequence at DMC event, and you can watch the film’s original third-draft ending embedded below.

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The film dodged another bullet as it was almost released under the titled “Spaceman From Pluto.” Universal president Sidney Sheinberg was convinced that no movie with “Future” in the title had ever been successful. Coming off the hugely successful E.T., Sheinberg loved the idea of Marty being mistaken as an Alien, and sent a memo suggested the “Spaceman From Pluto” title, and included a bunch of suggestions on how to incorporate the idea better into the story. Zemeckis was freaked out, and everyone was afraid to argue with Sheinberg about his new idea. Spielberg eventually dictated a memo back to Sheinberg saying “Dear Sid, Thank you for your most humorous memo. We got a big laugh out of it. Keep ’em coming.” Spielberg said that Sheinberg would be so embarrassed to tell them that he was actually serious, and that they’d probably never hear from him again. And Spielberg was right.

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Thanks to Luis R for the tip on the video.

Read More: https://www.slashfilm.com/504550/how-back-to-the-future-almost-nuked-the-fridge/?utm_campaign=clip

Read More: https://www.slashfilm.com/504550/how-back-to-the-future-almost-nuked-the-fridge/?utm_campaign=clip

Ounce by ounce, Nutritious food costs up to 10 times more than junk food.

14/08/2022

https://archive.nytimes.com/well.blogs.nytimes.com/2007/12/05/a-high-price-for-healthy-food/?mtrref=undefined&gwh=A4BCF41F9DF50588B05D5ADFF4D0A8AC&gwt=pay&assetType=PAYWALL

What Does The Evidence Say?

We’ll get straight to the point here.Caliber Strong

It does seem pretty conclusive that on a per calorie basis healthy foods are generally more expensive than junk foods.

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This means that healthier foods – like fruits, vegetables, and lean meats – are more expensive for any given number of calories than heavily processed junk foods, which contain more simple carbs and trans fats.

In fact, according to a recent meta analysis of 27 studies, it is estimated that a healthy diet costs about $1.5 more per day than an unhealthy diet.

And while this may not seem like a lot, at $550 more per year this can add up – especially when considering the costs of buying food for a few people.

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Is That The Full Story?

Well, as you might have guessed, the story doesn’t quite end there…

You see, even though it does seem like junk food is cheaper than healthy food, on a per calorie basis, this can be a bit misleading.

Indeed, according to a recent USDA study, vegetables, fruits, and other healthy foods can actually be more affordable than junk foods, in terms of making you feel full and satisfying you.

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For instance, a pack of potato chips is unlikely to satisfy you as much as a serving of black beans, even though the potato chips might be 200-300 calories compared to 100ish calories of black beans.

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And if you ate 200-300 calories worth of black beans, you’d be considerably more full than from a comparable number of potato chip calories…

The study concludes that when looked at in terms of their volume and weight, healthy foods do not seem to be more expensive than junk foods, even if they often contain fewer calories.

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And since many of us want to be consuming fewer calories anyway – while still feeling full, satisfied, and eating a decent overall volume of food – this can actually provide an added benefit of switching over to healthier foods, without an increase in cost.

To quote the USDA study author Andrea Carlson directly: “This is great news for all getting by with a limited food budget. You don’t have to compromise good nutrition.”

In Conclusion

In short, healthy food both is and isn’t more expensive than junk food, depending on how you look at it.

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On a per calorie basis, it is certainly more expensive than many junk foods, which are generally far more calorie-dense.

However, when you look at it in terms of both satiety and volume, many healthier foods are often more filling for the cost, even when they provide a lower number of calories.

This means that if you want to lose weight, you shouldn’t shy away from healthier foods just because of the perceived higher costs.

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Instead, even though calorie-for-calorie these healthy foods can be more expensive, the fact that they also tend to be more filling will allow you to consume fewer of them while still feeling satisfied and losing weight.

And, of course, that is without even getting into the numerous nutritional benefits of eating a greater number of ‘healthy’ foods, such as taking in more protein, fiber, vitamins, and minerals,

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So now that you know the truth about the real cost of eating healthy, check out this follow-up article, which is all about how to go about eating healthy foods on budget.

Seven Percent Of All American Adults Believe That Chocolate Milk Comes From Brown Cows.

13/08/2022

https://www.art.com/products/p36552133858-sa-i9498791/dlillc-jersey-cow.htm?epik=dj0yJnU9OHBsSzJxakc2bjhTVzV2LWFZWVc0bWdIZ2VYM0lSQnUmcD0wJm49ZGNpMTNsWjBSNi1sYUdkSkVUN0x3dyZ0PUFBQUFBR0wzYTQw

Seven percent of all American adults believe that chocolate milk comes from brown cows, according to a nationally representative online survey commissioned by the Innovation Center of U.S. Dairy.

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If you do the math, that works out to 16.4 million misinformed, milk-drinking people. The equivalent of the population of Pennsylvania (and then some!) does not know that chocolate milk is milk, cocoa and sugar.

But while the survey has attracted snorts and jeers from some corners — “um, guys, [milk] comes from cows — and not just the brown kind,” snarked Food & Wine — the most surprising thing about this figure may actually be that it isn’t higher.

For decades, observers in agriculture, nutrition and education have griped that many Americans are basically agriculturally illiterate. They don’t know where food is grown, how it gets to stores — or even, in the case of chocolate milk, what’s in it.

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One Department of Agriculture study, commissioned in the early ’90s, found that nearly 1 in 5 adults did not know that hamburgers are made from beef. Many more lacked familiarity with basic farming facts, like how big U.S. farms typically are and what food animals eat.

Experts in ag education aren’t convinced that much has changed in the intervening decades.

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“At the end of the day, it’s an exposure issue,” said Cecily Upton, co-founder of the nonprofit FoodCorps, which brings agricultural and nutrition education into elementary schools. “Right now, we’re conditioned to think that if you need food, you go to the store. Nothing in our educational framework teaches kids where food comes from before that point.”

Upton and other educators are quick to caution that these conclusions don’t apply across the board. Studies have shown that people who live in agricultural communities tend to know a bit more about where their food comes from, as do people with higher education levels and household incomes.

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But in some populations, confusion about basic food facts can skew pretty high. When one team of researchers interviewed fourth-, fifth- and sixth-graders at an urban California school, they found that more than half of them didn’t know pickles were cucumbers, or that onions and lettuce were plants. Four in 10 didn’t know that hamburgers came from cows. And 3 in 10 didn’t know that cheese is made from milk.

“All informants recalled the names of common foods in raw form and most knew foods were grown on farms or in gardens,” the researchers concluded. “They did not, however, possess schema necessary to articulate an understanding of post-production activities nor the agricultural crop origin of common foods.”

In some ways, this ignorance is perfectly logical. The writer and historian Ann Vileisis has argued that it developed in lockstep with the industrial food system.

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As more Americans moved into cities in the mid-1800s, she writes in the book “Kitchen Literacy,” fewer were involved in food production or processing. That trend was exacerbated by innovations in transportation and manufacturing that made it possible to ship foods in different forms, and over great distances.

By the time uniformity, hygiene and brand loyalty became modern ideals — the latter frequently encouraged by emerging food companies in well-funded ad campaigns — many Americans couldn’t imagine the origins of the boxed cereals or shrink-wrapped hot dogs in their kitchens.

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Today, many Americans only experience food as an industrial product that doesn’t look much like the original animal or plant: The USDA says orange juice is the most popular “fruit” in America, and processed potatoes — in the form of french fries and chips — rank among the top vegetables.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2017/06/15/seven-percent-of-americans-think-chocolate-milk-comes-from-brown-cows-and-thats-not-even-the-scary-part/

“Indifference about the origins and production of foods became a norm of urban culture, laying the groundwork for a modern food sensibility that would spread all across America in the decades that followed,” Vileisis wrote, of the 20th century. “Within a relatively brief period, the average distance from farm to kitchen had grown from a short walk down the garden path to a convoluted, 1,500-mile energy-guzzling journey by rail and truck.”

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The past 20 years have seen the birth of a movement to reverse this gap, with agriculture and nutrition groups working to get ag education back into classrooms.

Aside from FoodCorps, which worked with slightly more than 100,000 students this year, groups like the National Agriculture in the Classroom Organization and the American Farm Bureau Foundation are actively working with K-12 teachers across the country to add nutrition, farm technology and agricultural economics to lessons in social studies, science and health. The USDA Farm to School program, which awarded $5 million in grants for the 2017-2018 school year on Monday, also funds projects on agriculture education.

For National Dairy Month, which is June, NACO has been featuring a kindergarten-level lesson on dairy. Among its main takeaways: milk — plain, unflavored, boring white milk — comes from cows, not the grocery case.

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Nutritionists and food-system reformers say these basic lessons are critical to raising kids who know how to eat healthfully — an important aid to tackling heart disease and obesity.

Meanwhile, farm groups argue the lack of basic food knowledge can lead to poor policy decisions.

2012 white paper from the National Institute for Animal Agriculture blamed consumers for what it considers bad farm regulations: “One factor driving today’s regulatory environment … is pressure applied by consumers, the authors wrote. “Unfortunately, a majority of today’s consumers are at least three generations removed from agriculture, are not literate about where food comes from and how it is produced.”

Upton, of FoodCorps, said everyone could benefit from a better understanding of agriculture.

“We still get kids who are surprised that a french fry comes from a potato, or that a pickle is a cucumber,” she said. “… Knowledge is power. Without it, we can’t make informed decisions.”

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Editor’s note: A previous version of this story incorrectly reported that the survey in question was commissioned by the National Dairy Council. It was actually commissioned by the Innovation Center of U.S. Dairy, its sister organization.

Read more:

What is “natural food”? Even the people who make it aren’t sure.

Why what we think about eating is so often wrong

Baby carrots are not baby carrots

Gift Article

Image without a caption

By Caitlin DeweyCaitlin Dewey is The Washington Post’s food policy writer for Wonkblog. She previously covered digital culture and technology for The Post.

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Japan has 23 vending machines per person.

12/08/2022

https://thecreativeadventurer.com/amazing-vending-machines-you-wont-believe-exist-in-japan/

One thing is for sure when you visit Japan; there are vending machines in almost every street you walk. From dispensing simple supplies like basic groceries to weird options like underwear and puppies, there are so many options. There are even vending machines for prayer cards, gifts, and surgical masks. According to a survey by the Japan Vending Machines Association, more than 5 million vending units are spread nationally. This means that there’s a vending machine to serve every 23 individuals.

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This is not all. The association argues that at least $60 billion is generated in sales annually by local vending machines. Leading the pack are vending dispensers for fast-moving items like sodas, water, hot foods, candies, and energy drinks. If you observe closely, you’ll notice that vending machines epitomize the Japanese culture. You’ll see print details of the Japanese lifestyle in the design of the vending machines.

Closing Thought:

Japan is undeniably the world’s leading vending machine nation. With so many vending units spread across the country, you can buy virtually anything found in a retail store or a restaurant. The vending machine technology is increasingly becoming advanced. So, we should expect more vending machine innovations in the future in Japan.

Read More Of The Article: How Many Vending Machines in Japan

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Tsundoku is the act of acquiring books and not reading them.

12/08/2022

https://bzfd.it/3dIuAO5

Picture From BuzzFeed Article: 17 Spectacular Bookshops In Australia To See Before You Die

There’s A Japanese Word For People Who Buy More Books Than They Can Actually Read

Hello, fellow book hoarders.

Katherine Brooks

By Katherine Brooks

Apr 19, 2017, 05:00 PM EDT| Updated Apr 23, 2017

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Book hoarding is a well-documented habit.

In fact, most literary types are pretty proud of the practice, steadfast in their desire to stuff shelves to maximum capacity. They’re not looking to stop hoarding, because parting with pieces of carefully curated piles is hard and stopping yourself from buying the next Strand staff pick is even harder. So, sorry Marie Kondo, but the books are staying.

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The desire to buy more books than you can physically read in one human lifetime is actually so universal, there’s a specific word for it: tsundoku. Defined as the stockpiling of books that will never be consumed, the term is a Japanese portmanteau of sorts, combining the words “tsunde” (meaning “to stack things”), “oku” (meaning “to leave for a while”) and “doku” (meaning “to read”).

We were reminded of the term this week, when Apartment Therapy published a primer for those looking to complete book-hoarder rehab. Several blogs have written on the topic before, though, surfacing new and interesting details about the word so perfect for book nerds everywhere.

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While most who’ve written on the topic of tsundoku use the word to describe the condition of book hoarding itself, The LA Times used the term as a noun that describes the person suffering from book stockpiling syndrome, or “a person who buys books and doesn’t read them, and then lets them pile up on the floor, on shelves, and assorted pieces of furniture.”

Tsundoku has no direct synonym in English, Oxford Dictionaries clarified in a blog post, defining the word as “the act of leaving a book unread after buying it, typically piling it up together with other such unread books.” An informative subreddit provides even more context, explaining that “the tsundoku scale” ranges from just one unread book to a serious hoard. “Everyone is most likely to be ‘tsundokursed’ one way or the other,” it warns.

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According to Quartz, tsundoku has quite a history. It originated as a play on words in the late 19th century, during what is considered the Meiji Era in Japan. At first, the “oku” in “tsunde oku” morphed into “doku,” meaning “to read,” but since “tsunde doku” is a bit of a mouthful, the phrase eventually condensed into “tsundoku.” And a word for reading addicts was born.

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Speaking of addictions ― the term “bibliomania” emerged in England around the same time as “tsundoku.” Thomas Frognall Dibdin, an English cleric and bibliographer, wrote Bibliomania, or Book Madness: A Bibliographical Romance in the 1800s, outlining a fictional “neurosis” that prompted those suffering from it to obsessively collect books of all sorts.

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Bibliomania has a dark past, documented more as a pseudo-illness that inspired real fear than a harmless knack for acquiring books we won’t have time to read. “Some collectors spent their entire fortunes to build their personal libraries,” Lauren Young wrote for Atlas Obscura. “While it was never medically classified, people in the 1800s truly feared bibliomania.”

Tsundoku seems to better capture the lighter side of compulsive book shopping, a word that evokes images of precariously stacked tomes one good breeze away from toppling over. While there’s no English equivalent quite as beautiful, no one’s stopping you from incorporating the Japanese word into your regular vocabulary.

“As with other Japanese words like karaoke, tsunami, and otaku, I think it’s high time that tsundoku enter the English language,” Open Culture wrote in 2014. “Now if only we can figure out a word to describe unread ebooks that languish on your Kindle. E-tsundoku? Tsunkindle?”

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Portland was named by a coin flip.

11/08/2022

https://handluggageonly.co.uk/2021/12/24/11-best-things-to-do-in-portland-oregon/
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How did Portland get its name? (And who doesn’t know the right answer?)

KARI CHISHOLM 

It’s a story that every third-grader in Oregon knows. As recounted by PDXHistory.com:

Portland got its name when Asa Lovejoy and Francis Pettygrove flipped a coin in 1845. Lovejoy was from Massachusetts and he wanted to name the new settlement Boston. Pettygrove was from Maine and wanted to name the new town Portland. Pettygrove won the coin toss two out of three times and the rest as they say is history.

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As Travel Portland (formerly POVA) notes, it actually happened – and the historical penny is on display at the Oregon Historical Society. And just a month ago, the Oregonian’s history columnist said Asa Lovejoy “famously flipped the coin that gave Portland its name.”

Just about everyone in Oregon knows this story.

But do you know who does NOT know how Portland got its name?

From yesterday’s OPB News:

You heard that right. Gordon Smith believes that “Portland is called Portland because it’s a Port.”

No, Senator Smith, it’s not.

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Portland is called Portland because the city’s founder, Francis Pettygrove, won a coin toss. Otherwise, we’d be Boston.

This is just embarrassing.

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It’s illegal for supermarkets in France to waste food.

Post First Published: 10/08/2022 7:03 PM Post First Updated: 9/09/2022 11:22 AM

https://www.buzzfeed.com/marietelling/french-supermarkets-american-food-aisle?epik=dj0yJnU9YWxSdTdaYm5Pa1Q2YW01R2FTdk9NcktheDlfNTdqcXUmcD0wJm49T3RiWk5QXzJ1U1dmb3RlclA2eGNJdyZ0PUFBQUFBR0x6Y3FF

France has become the first country in the world to ban supermarkets from throwing away or destroying unsold food, forcing them instead to donate it to charities and food banks.

According to a law that the French senate unanimously approved in 2016, large stores won’t throw out high-quality food that is getting close to its best-before date as of this Wednesday.  Charities will be able to provide millions more low-income individuals with free meals each year.

The law is the result of a grassroots effort in France by consumers, anti-poverty activists, and food waste opponents.  Councilman Arash Derambarsh launched the initiative that resulted in a petition. 

The issue was addressed by a measure that Guillaume Garot, a former minister of the food industry, sponsored and which was approved by the national assembly in December.

Now, activists are trying to get the EU to enact uniform legislation for all of its members. Food banks have praised the bill, and they will immediately start looking for more volunteers, lorries, storage space, and refrigerators to accommodate an increase in donations from stores and food producers.

Additionally, supermarkets won’t be allowed to purposefully degrade food to prevent foragers from consuming it. 

Families, students, the unemployed, and the homeless have all been using supermarket trash cans as a source of food in France in recent years. 

Edible goods have been discovered to be thrown out when their best-before dates drew near.

READ: 19 Things About French Supermarkets That Are Low-Key Fascinating

To prevent food illness from goods removed from bins, several retailers reportedly sprayed food in bleach before placing it in the trash. 

Other supermarkets purposefully disposed of food in secured storage for garbage trucks to pick up.

Now, owners of supermarkets with a footprint of 400 square metres (4,305 square feet) or more are required to establish agreements with charity about donations or pay a fine of €3,750 (£2,900).

The president of the French food bank network Banques Alimentaires, Jacques Bailet, characterised the bill as “good and very significant symbolically.” 

He claimed that it would significantly boost a trend that is currently taking hold in which shops give to food banks.

Beer was not considered an alcoholic beverage in Russia until 2013.

Post First Published: 10/08/2022

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http://www.vinspireuk.com/2015/07/best-of-british-beers-craft-beer-club.html
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Many Russians consider beer a soft drink – a light refresher that can be guzzled on the way to work or sucked down in great quantities before a picnic and a swim in the river.

Hard drinkers sniff at its weakness, as the saying goes: “Beer without vodka is like throwing money to the wind.”

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Until 2013, the brew has been considered a foodstuff along with all other drinks under 10 per cent in strength. An array of international and local brands from Amstel to Efes and Baltika to Zhiguli could be bought from street kiosks or at railway stations, as well as from countless 24-hour corner shops, just like fruit juice or mineral water.

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Morning or evening, people supping from cans or bottles are a common sight in parks, squares and on Moscow’s Metro.

The average Russian drinks the equivalent of 32 pints of pure alcohol per year and about 500,000 deaths annually are thought to be drink-related. That includes a large number of about 30,000 annual road accident deaths and of several thousand cases of drowning.

Vodka remains the most popular – and most damaging – alcoholic drink in Russia but beer has been steadily advancing on it in recent years.

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The new measures restricting sales could be a blow to beer’s challenge.

Isaac Sheps, the chairman of the Union of Russian Brewers, claimed that cutting access to beer – including attempts by some regional governments to ban sales after 7pm or 8pm rather than 11pm – could be damaging to health.

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“It will be tougher if you want to buy a beer on the way home from work, or pop down from your apartment,” he told the Daily Telegraph.

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“So you have to stock at home. And stocking beer is more problematic than stocking vodka. It’s bulky, it’s big, there’s no room for it in small homes. It’s much easier to buy two bottles of vodka and manage for your instant need for alcohol.

“So it’s quite ironic that this attempt to improve health and lower alcoholism could have the opposite effect and cause people to drink more harmful spirits.”

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Apple’s iPhone has higher sales than everything Microsoft has to offer.

10/08/2022

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-9990497/Apple-debuts-699-iPhone-13-including-new-PINK-color-option-battery-lasts-2-5-hours-longer.html?ito=push-notification&ci=MvFdpAfkaY&cri=V_i3KxctmE&si=34787595&xi=fc701ae8-be4e-450d-a227-1b9221230f53&ai=9990497
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From: Apple’s iPhone Is Now Worth More Than All Of Microsoft. Forbes. By Tim Worstall. Aug 19, 2012,08:43am EDT

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This is an entirely stunning statistic: Apple‘s iPhone sales are now worth more than all of Microsoft:

One Apple product, something that didn’t exist five years ago, has higher sales than everything Microsoft has to offer. More than Windows, Office, Xbox, Bing, Windows Phone, and every other product that Microsoft has created since 1975. In the quarter ended March 31, 2012, iPhone had sales of $22.7 billion; Microsoft Corporation, $17.4 billion.

Now when we say “worth” there’s a number of different things that we can mean. One way would be to try and measure the stock market value of the iPhone against all of Microsoft for example. But this isn’t something easily done: sure, we could make attempts at it but we’d not get very close to a decent result. Too much of the value that we ascribe to Apple is of the entire ecosystem, including the company’s reputation for style, for us to really be able to pull out separate market valuations for a specific product.

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We might also try looking at profits: we know what those are for Microsoft but pulling them out for the iPhone alone would be difficult. Partly the problem above, we’re absolutely certain that the iPhone makes more profits as an Apple product than it would if exactly the same item were being sold by anyone else. Partly also how it influences the whole Apple ecosystem: what portion of iTunes profits should be ascribed to the iPhone, what to the iPad, what to entirely other systems?

While it’s not really correct, for “worth” implies a stock value not a flow value, and sales is a flow not a stock, the easiest of the available numbers to use is just that: compare the sales. And as Vanity Fair notes, the value of sales of iPhones is now greater than the value of the entirety of Microsoft’s sales.

And the thing is, that’s not really the most remarkable thing about Apple’s recent achievements. The truly strange thing is that they’ve managed to gain this level of sales while making software style margins on selling hardware. That’s the trick that no one else is managing at all.

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There’s a Starbucks coffee cup in every scene of Fight Club.

Post First Published: 9/08/2022 7:26 PM Post First Updated: 3/09/2022 12:48 PM

https://i.pinimg.com/originals/7e/fb/e4/7efbe432efd496b0415283d5525eb5a8.jpg
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Eagled-eyed fans have noticed the Starbucks cup Easter eggs hidden throughout Fight Club. But why are they there, and what do they mean?

From: Fight Club’s Starbucks Cup Easter Egg & Meaning Explained ScreenRant. BY NIALL GRAY UPDATED JUL 22, 2022

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Spotting the Starbucks cup Easter egg in Fight Club has long been a hobby of many of the film’s most hardcore fans, but what exactly does it mean? Despite receiving early mixed responses, Fight Club has since become considered one of the greatest films of the ’90s. It’s a film that’s as deep as it is memorable, and as such, its fans have had fun closely examining every inch of the film for Easter eggs inserted by director David Fincher.

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One such Easter egg is the film’s use of Starbucks coffee cups. In almost every single scene of the film, a cup can be spotted emblazoned with the Starbucks logo, and it’s something that adds an extra layer to the film to make it all the more rewatchable. In a film like Fight Club – and from a director like David Fincher – the cups are obviously more than just… well, cups. So what exactly do Fight Club‘s Starbucks cups mean?

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From another director, it would be easy to dismiss Fight Club as little more than an excuse to have a shirtless Brad Pitt work out by beating other shirtless men senseless. From Fincher, though, there are always deeper themes, and his intense attention to detail is something that always bleeds through into his movies. Fight Club‘s Starbucks Easter egg is a prime example of this, as Fincher clearly went to considerable lengths to hide the cups in each scene of the film. By having the Starbucks logo so regularly and so subtly placed throughout the film, Fincher actually highlights Fight Club‘s point about consumerism.

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From another director, it would be easy to dismiss Fight Club as little more than an excuse to have a shirtless Brad Pitt work out by beating other shirtless men senseless. From Fincher, though, there are always deeper themes, and his intense attention to detail is something that always bleeds through into his movies. Fight Club‘s Starbucks Easter egg is a prime example of this, as Fincher clearly went to considerable lengths to hide the cups in each scene of the film. By having the Starbucks logo so regularly and so subtly placed throughout the film, Fincher actually highlights Fight Club‘s point about consumerism.

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Hiding so many cups in plain sight points out the way in which the audience is conditioned not to notice product placement. The way in which the film criticizes modern society has actually led many to label Fight Club the perfect Joker origin story, and its Starbucks cup Easter egg is yet another layer to the film that furthers its societal critique. The specific use of Starbucks may seem like the director has a personal vendetta against the coffee chain, but speaking with EmpireFincher actually said of Fight Club‘s Starbucks cups:

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“We had a lot of fun using that — there are Starbucks cups everywhere, in every shot. I don’t have anything personal against Starbucks. I think they’re trying to do a good thing. They’re just too successful.”

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The Starbucks cup Easter egg makes Fight Club even more rewatchable and makes for an interesting inclusion in one of David Fincher’s and Brad Pitt’s best movies. Like with all of Fincher’s films, it’s a testament to the director’s attention to detail and willingness to put the finest of points on his film’s deeper themes and symbolism. Not only is it a subtle dig at consumerism, but Fight Club‘s Starbucks cup Easter egg is also a fun addition to an excellent film.

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Read More: Fight Club’s Starbucks Cup Easter Egg & Meaning Explained

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